"And every day there were what we called 'the Green Hills'; that is, the low line of Castlereagh Hills which we saw from the nursery windows. They were not very far off but they were, to children, quite unattainable. They taught me longing--Sehnsucht; made me for good or ill, and before I was six years old, a votary of the Blue Flower." --C. S. Lewis, Surprised by Joy

The Blue Flower (German: Blaue Blume) is a central symbol of Inspiration. It stands for desire, love, and the metaphysical striving for the infinite and unreachable. German author Novalis first used the symbol in his unfinished Bildungsroman, entitled Heinrich von Ofterdingen. After contemplating a meeting with a stranger, the young Heinrich von Ofterdingen dreams about blue flowers which call to him and absorb his attention. In some cultures, blue roses traditionally signify a mystery, or attaining the impossible, or the neverending quest for the impossible. They are believed to be able to grant the owner youth or grant wishes.

Delphinidin is an anthocyanidin, a primary plant pigment, and also an antioxidant. Delphinidin gives blue hues to flowers like violas and delphiniums. It also gives the blue-red color of the grape that produces Cabernet Sauvignon, and can be found in cranberries and Concord grapes as well as pomegranates. --Wikipedia

 

fashionsfromhistory:

Woman’s Banyan

1750-1760

British 

This is an unusual example of a banyan or nightgown for a woman. In the 1650s, the introduction of the Japanese kimono to Western society by the Dutch East India Company started a fashion for these simple loose garments. While it was difficult to import traditional kimonos from Japan, English tailors were soon making them up in the most fashionable silks. The woman’s banyan remained an informal garment throughout the 18th century. It would have been worn over stays and petticoats in the privacy of home, either in the morning before dressing formally for the day or in the evening before changing for bed. This particular example from the period 1750 to 1770 combines the traditional T-shape of a kimono with the conventional European shaping for a woman’s gown at the back and sides. (Victoria and Albert)

V&A

amymebberson:

Pocket Princesses 120: Scotland for Nay.
Merida, ya numpty…
Please reblog, do not repost!
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amymebberson:

Pocket Princesses 120: Scotland for Nay.

Merida, ya numpty…

Please reblog, do not repost!

Facebook Page

I know that you’re confused about who you are, so I’m going to tell you…

(Source: ouatdaily)