"And every day there were what we called 'the Green Hills'; that is, the low line of Castlereagh Hills which we saw from the nursery windows. They were not very far off but they were, to children, quite unattainable. They taught me longing--Sehnsucht; made me for good or ill, and before I was six years old, a votary of the Blue Flower." --C. S. Lewis, Surprised by Joy

The Blue Flower (German: Blaue Blume) is a central symbol of Inspiration. It stands for desire, love, and the metaphysical striving for the infinite and unreachable. German author Novalis first used the symbol in his unfinished Bildungsroman, entitled Heinrich von Ofterdingen. After contemplating a meeting with a stranger, the young Heinrich von Ofterdingen dreams about blue flowers which call to him and absorb his attention. In some cultures, blue roses traditionally signify a mystery, or attaining the impossible, or the neverending quest for the impossible. They are believed to be able to grant the owner youth or grant wishes.

Delphinidin is an anthocyanidin, a primary plant pigment, and also an antioxidant. Delphinidin gives blue hues to flowers like violas and delphiniums. It also gives the blue-red color of the grape that produces Cabernet Sauvignon, and can be found in cranberries and Concord grapes as well as pomegranates. --Wikipedia

 

Eleonora di Garzia di Toledo by Alessandro Allori. Tragic story for this one: Eleonora, more often known as “Leonora” or “Dianora”, was “beautiful, gracious, genteel, becoming, charming, affable, and above all had two eyes in her head which were like two stars in their beauty”. Leonora was born in Florence, where she was brought up by Cosimo and Eleanor of Toledo, her aunt and namesake. Betrothed to their son Pietro at the age of 15, she blossomed under the wing of Pietro’s older sister, the artistic patron Isabella, into a vivacious and witty beauty. Her marriage, like Isabella’s, was not a success, and she followed her mentor’s example of taking lovers. For this reason, Pietro had her brought in 1576 to the country retreat of Cafaggiolo, where he strangled her to death with a dog leash. Cosimo’s successor, Francesco I, tacitly approved the murder, and Pietro was never brought to justice for it. Until recently, little was known of Leonora di Garzia di Toledo, and she was not identified as the sitter of several portraits of her. The facts of her life have emerged from the growing scholarship on Isabella de’ Medici, with whom she has much in common.

Eleonora di Garzia di Toledo by Alessandro Allori. Tragic story for this one: Eleonora, more often known as “Leonora” or “Dianora”, was “beautiful, gracious, genteel, becoming, charming, affable, and above all had two eyes in her head which were like two stars in their beauty”. Leonora was born in Florence, where she was brought up by Cosimo and Eleanor of Toledo, her aunt and namesake. Betrothed to their son Pietro at the age of 15, she blossomed under the wing of Pietro’s older sister, the artistic patron Isabella, into a vivacious and witty beauty. Her marriage, like Isabella’s, was not a success, and she followed her mentor’s example of taking lovers. For this reason, Pietro had her brought in 1576 to the country retreat of Cafaggiolo, where he strangled her to death with a dog leash. Cosimo’s successor, Francesco I, tacitly approved the murder, and Pietro was never brought to justice for it. Until recently, little was known of Leonora di Garzia di Toledo, and she was not identified as the sitter of several portraits of her. The facts of her life have emerged from the growing scholarship on Isabella de’ Medici, with whom she has much in common.

  1. coeurdelhistoire reblogged this from artekka
  2. artekka posted this